UCAGenomiX related publications

Du to our strong expertise in "omics" experiments and in microRNAs topics we decided to separate into 3 categories the related publications into which the Functional genomics Platform of Nice-Sophia-Antipolis is involved :
  1. Expression studies (DNA microarrays and high-throughput sequencing experiments)
  2. MicroRNA studies
  3. Miscellaneous

Rios Geraldine

 rios@ipmc.cnrs.fr
 04 93 95 77 90
 660 route des lucioles 06560 Valbonne - Sophia-Antipolis

8 publications found

1. A new long noncoding RNA (LncRNA) is induced in cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma and downregulates several anticancer and cell-differentiation genes in mouse.
J Biol Chem. 2017 Jun 8. pii: jbc.M117.776260. doi: 10.1074/jbc.M117.776260. [Epub ahead of print]
Ponzio G, Rezzonico R, Bourget I, Allan R, Nottet N, Popa A, Magnone V, Rios G, Mari B, Barbry P
Université Côte d’Azur, CNRS, IPMC, France. Université Côte d'Azur, CNRS, INSERM, IRCAN, France.

Keratinocyte-derived cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (cSCC) is the most common metastatic skin cancer. Although some of the early events involved in this pathology have been identified, the subsequent steps leading to tumor development are poorly defined. We demonstrate here that the development of mouse tumors induced by the concomitant application of a carcinogen and a tumor promoter (7,12 dimethylbenz[a]anthracene [DMBA] and 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate [TPA], respectively) is associated with the upregulation of a previously uncharacterized long noncoding RNA (lncRNA), termed AK144841. We found that AK144841 expression was absent from normal skin and was specifically stimulated in tumors and highly tumorigenic cells. We also found that AK144841 exists in two variants, one consisting of a large 2-kb transcript composed of four exons and one of a 1.8-kb transcript lacking the second exon. Gain- and loss-of-function studies indicated that AK144841 mainly inhibited gene expression, specifically downregulating the expression of genes of the late-cornified-envelope-1 (Lce1) family involved in epidermal terminal differentiation and of anticancer genes such as Cgref1, Brsk1, Basp1, Dusp5, Btg2, Anpep, Dhrs9, Stfa2, Tpm1, SerpinB2, Cpa4, Crct1, Cryab, Il24, Csf2, and Rgs16. Interestingly, the lack of the second exon significantly decreased AK144841's inhibitory effect on gene expression. We also noted that high AK144841 expression correlated with a low expression of the aforementioned genes and with the tumorigenic potential of cell lines. These findings suggest that AK144841 could contribute to the dedifferentiation program of tumor-forming keratinocytes and to molecular cascades leading to tumor development.
Pubmed link : 28596382

2. Elucidation of IgH 3' region regulatory role during class switch recombination via germline deletion.
Nat Commun. 2015 May 11;6:7084. doi: 10.1038/ncomms8084.
Saintamand A, Rouaud P, Saad F, Rios G, Cogné M, Denizot Y
Université de Limoges, CRIBL, UMR 7276, Limoges 87000, France [2] CNRS UMR 7276, Limoges 87000, France. CNRS et Université de Nice Sophia Antipolis, Institut de Pharmacologie Moléculaire et Cellulaire, UMR 6097, Sophia Antipolis 06560, France. Université de Limoges, CRIBL, UMR 7276, Limoges 87000, France [2] CNRS UMR 7276, Limoges 87000, France [3] Institut Universitaire de France, Paris 87025, France.

In mature B cells, class switch recombination (CSR) replaces the expressed constant Cμ gene with a downstream C(H) gene. How the four transcriptional enhancers of the IgH 3' regulatory region (3'RR) control CSR remains an open question. We have investigated IgG1 CSR in 3'RR-deficient mice. Here we show that the 3'RR enhancers target the S(γ1) acceptor region (and poorly the S(μ) donor region) by acting on epigenetic marks, germline transcription, paused RNA Pol II recruitment, R loop formation, AID targeting and double-strand break generation. In contrast, location and diversity of S(μ)-S(γ1) junctions are not affected by deletion of the 3'RR enhancers. Thus, the 3'RR controls the first steps of CSR by priming the S acceptor region but is not implicated in the choice of the end-joining pathway.
Pubmed link : 25959683

3. MiR-129-5p is required for histone deacetylase inhibitor-induced cell death in thyroid cancer cells.
Endocr Relat Cancer. 2011 Nov 14;18(6):711-9. doi: 10.1530/ERC-10-0257. Print 2011 Dec.
Brest P, Lassalle S, Hofman V, Bordone O, Gavric Tanga V, Bonnetaud C, Moreilhon C, Rios G, Santini J, Barbry P, Svanborg C, Mograbi B, Mari B, Hofman P
Nice, France.

The molecular mechanism responsible for the antitumor activity of histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) remains elusive. As HDACi have been described to alter miRNA expression, the aim of this study was to characterize HDACi-induced miRNAs and to determine their functional importance in the induction of cell death alone or in combination with other cancer drugs. Two HDACi, trichostatin A and vorinostat, induced miR-129-5p overexpression, histone acetylation and cell death in BCPAP, TPC-1, 8505C, and CAL62 cell lines and in primary cultures of papillary thyroid cancer (PTC) cells. In addition, miR-129-5p alone was sufficient to induce cell death and knockdown experiments showed that expression of this miRNA was required for HDACi-induced cell death. Moreover, miR-129-5p accentuated the anti-proliferative effects of other cancer drugs such as etoposide or human α-lactalbumin made lethal for tumor cells (HAMLET). Taken together, our data show that miR-129-5p is involved in the antitumor activity of HDACi and highlight a miRNA-driven cell death mechanism.
Pubmed link : 21946411

4. Can the microRNA signature distinguish between thyroid tumors of uncertain malignant potential and other well-differentiated tumors of the thyroid gland?
Endocr Relat Cancer. 2011 Sep 13;18(5):579-94. Print 2011 Oct.
Lassalle S, Hofman V, Ilie M, Bonnetaud C, Puisségur MP, Brest P, Loubatier C, Guevara N, Bordone O, Cardinaud B, Lebrigand K, Rios G, Santini J, Franc B, Mari B, Al Ghuzlan A, Vielh P, Barbry P, Hofman P
INSERM ERI-21/EA4319, University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, 06107 Nice, France.

The term 'thyroid tumors of uncertain malignant potential' (TT-UMP) was coined by surgical pathologists to define well-differentiated tumors (WDT) showing inconclusive morphological evidence of malignancy or benignity. We have analyzed the expression of microRNA (miRNA) in a training set of 42 WDT of different histological subtypes: seven follicular tumors of UMP (FT-UMP), six WDT-UMP, seven follicular thyroid adenomas (FTA), 11 conventional papillary thyroid carcinomas (C-PTC), five follicular variants of PTC (FV-PTC), and six follicular thyroid carcinomas (FTC), which led to the identification of about 40 deregulated miRNAs. A subset of these altered miRNAs was independently validated by qRT-PCR, which included 18 supplementary TT-UMP (eight WDT-UMP and ten FT-UMP). Supervised clustering techniques were used to predict the first 42 samples. Based on the four possible outcomes (FTA, C-PTC, FV-PTC, and FTC), about 80% of FTA and C-PTC and 50% of FV-PTC and FTC samples were correctly assigned. Analysis of the independent set of 18 WDT-UMP by quantitative RT-PCR for the selection of the six most discriminating miRNAs was unable to separate FT-UMP from WDT-UMP, suggesting that the miRNA signature is insufficient in characterizing these two clinical entities. We conclude that considering FT-UMP and WDT-UMP as distinct and specific clinical entities may improve the diagnosis of WDT of the thyroid gland. In this context, a small set of miRNAs (i.e. miR-7, miR-146a, miR-146b, miR-200b, miR-221, and miR-222) appears to be useful, though not sufficient per se, in distinguishing TT-UMP from other WDT of the thyroid gland.
Pubmed link : 21778212

5. Identification of keratinocyte growth factor as a target of microRNA-155 in lung fibroblasts: implication in epithelial-mesenchymal interactions.
PLoS One. 2009 Aug 24;4(8):e6718.
Pottier N, Maurin T, Chevalier B, Puissegur MP, Lebrigand K, Robbe-Sermesant K, Bertero T, Lino Cardenas CL, Courcot E, Rios G, Fourre S, Lo-Guidice JM, Marcet B, Cardinaud B, Barbry P, Mari B
CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, UMR6097, Sophia Antipolis, France.

BACKGROUND: Epithelial-mesenchymal interactions are critical in regulating many aspects of vertebrate embryo development, and for the maintenance of homeostatic equilibrium in adult tissues. The interactions between epithelium and mesenchyme are believed to be mediated by paracrine signals such as cytokines and extracellular matrix components secreted from fibroblasts that affect adjacent epithelia. In this study, we sought to identify the repertoire of microRNAs (miRNAs) in normal lung human fibroblasts and their potential regulation by the cytokines TNF-alpha, IL-1beta and TGF-beta. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: MiR-155 was significantly induced by inflammatory cytokines TNF-alpha and IL-1beta while it was down-regulated by TGF-beta. Ectopic expression of miR-155 in human fibroblasts induced modulation of a large set of genes related to "cell to cell signalling", "cell morphology" and "cellular movement". This was consistent with an induction of caspase-3 activity and with an increase in cell migration in fibroblasts tranfected with miR-155. Using different miRNA bioinformatic target prediction tools, we found a specific enrichment for miR-155 predicted targets among the population of down-regulated transcripts. Among fibroblast-selective targets, one interesting hit was keratinocyte growth factor (KGF, FGF-7), a member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family, which owns two potential binding sites for miR-155 in its 3'-UTR. Luciferase assays experimentally validated that miR-155 can efficiently target KGF 3'-UTR. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that only one out of the 2 potential sites was truly functional. Functional in vitro assays experimentally validated that miR-155 can efficiently target KGF 3'-UTR. Furthermore, in vivo experiments using a mouse model of lung fibrosis showed that miR-155 expression level was correlated with the degree of lung fibrosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results strongly suggest a physiological function of miR-155 in lung fibroblasts. Altogether, this study implicates this miRNA in the regulation by mesenchymal cells of surrounding lung epithelium, making it a potential key player during tissue injury.
Pubmed link : 19701459

6. Genetic differences among Staphylococcus aureus isolates from dairy ruminant species: a single-dye DNA microarray approach
Vet Microbiol 133, 105-114
Vautor E, Magnone V, Rios G, Le Brigand K, Bergonier D, Lina G, Meugnier H, Barbry P, Thiery R, Pepin M
Agence Française de Securite Sanitaire des Aliments (AFSSA), Unite Pathologie des Petits Ruminants, Sophia-Antipolis, France. e.vautor@sophia.afssa.fr

Staphylococcus aureus is recognized worldwide as a major pathogen causing clinical or subclinical intramammary infections in lactating sheep, goats and cows. The present study was carried out to compare 65 S. aureus isolates mainly obtained from nasal carriage and subclinical mastitis in dairy sheep and 43 isolates obtained from subclinical mastitis from 22 goats and 21 cows. A DNA microarray, containing probes against 190 true or putative virulence factors, was used to detect the presence of the virulence genes. Their presence/absence was independently assessed by PCR for the genes of interest. Sheep isolates obtained from the nostrils or the udders did not show any significant tissue specific virulence factor. The dominant pulse-field electrophoresis profile (OV/OV'), associated with spa clonal complex spa-CC 1773, matched mainly with the agr group III and was only found in ovine and caprine isolates. This clone was more specifically characterized by the prevalence of the following virulence genes: lpl4, ssl6, bsaA1, bsaB, bsaP, SAV0812. Moreover, seven virulence-associated genes (lpl1, sel, sec, tst, lukF-PV-like component, lukM, SAV0876) were associated with isolates from small ruminants, while the egc cluster, fhuD1, abiF and SAV2496 with bovine isolates. This genomic study suggests the existence of lineage- and host-specific genes leading to the development of host-specific pathogenic traits of S. aureus isolates.
Pubmed link : 18640795

7. Relationships Between Early Inflammatory Response to Bleomycin and Sensitivity to Lung Fibrosis.
Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Aug 2;
Pottier N, Chupin C, Defamie V, Cardinaud B, Sutherland R, Rios G, Gauthier F, Wolters PJ, Berthiaume Y, Barbry P, Mari B
Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, UMR6097, CNRS and University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Sophia Antipolis, France.

RATIONALE. Different sensitivities to pro-fibrotic compounds such as bleomycin are observed among mouse strains. OBJECTIVES. To identify genetic factors contributing to the outcome of lung injury. METHODS. Physiological comparison of C57BL/6 sensitive and Balb/C resistant mice challenged with intra tracheal bleomycin instillation revealed several early differences: global gene expression profiles were thus established from lungs derived from the two strains, in the absence of any bleomycin administration. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS. Expression of 25 genes differed between the two strains. Among them, two molecules, not previously associated with pulmonary fibrosis, were identified. The first one corresponds to dipeptidyl peptidase I (DPPI), a cysteine dipeptidyl peptidase (also known as cathepsin C) essential for the activation of serine proteinases produced by immune/inflammatory cells. The second corresponds to TIMP-3, an inhibitor of matrix metalloproteases and of ADAMs such as the TNFconverting enzyme. In functional studies performed in the bleomycin induced lung fibrosis model, the level of expression of these two genes was closely correlated with specific early events associated with lung fibrosis, namely activation of PMN-derived serine proteases and TNFalpha-dependent inflammatory syndrome. Surprisingly, genetic deletion of DPPI in the context of a C57BL/6 genetic background did not protect against bleomycin-mediated fibrosis, suggesting additional function(s) for this key enzyme. CONCLUSIONS. This study highlights the importance of the early inflammatory events that follow bleomycin instillation in the development of lung fibrosis, and describes for the first time the roles that DPPI and TIMP-3 may play in this process.
Pubmed link : 17673693

8. An open-access long oligonucleotide microarray resource for analysis of the human and mouse transcriptomes.
Nucleic Acids Res. 2006 Jul 19;34(12):e87
Le Brigand K, Russell R, Moreilhon C, Rouillard JM, Jost B, Amiot F, Magnone V, Bole-Feysot C, Rostagno P, Virolle V, Defamie V, Dessen P, Williams G, Lyons P, Rios G, Mari B, Gulari E, Kastner P, Gidrol X, Freeman TC, Barbry P
CNRS, Institut de Pharmacologie Moleculaire et Cellulaire, UMR6097, 660, route des Lucioles, F-06560 Sophia Antipolis, France.

Two collections of oligonucleotides have been designed for preparing pangenomic human and mouse microarrays. A total of 148,993 and 121,703 oligonucleotides were designed against human and mouse transcripts. Quality scores were created in order to select 25,342 human and 24,109 mouse oligonucleotides. They correspond to: (i) a BLAST-specificity score; (ii) the number of expressed sequence tags matching each probe; (iii) the distance to the 3' end of the target mRNA. Scores were also used to compare in silico the two microarrays with commercial microarrays. The sets described here, called RNG/MRC collections, appear at least as specific and sensitive as those from the commercial platforms. The RNG/MRC collections have now been used by an Anglo-French consortium to distribute more than 3500 microarrays to the academic community. Ad hoc identification of tissue-specific transcripts and a approximately 80% correlation with hybridizations performed on Affymetrix GeneChiptrade mark suggest that the RNG/MRC microarrays perform well. This work provides a comprehensive open resource for investigators working on human and mouse transcriptomes, as well as a generic method to generate new microarray collections in other organisms. All information related to these probes, as well as additional information about commercial microarrays have been stored in a freely-accessible database called MEDIANTE.
Pubmed link : 17384016